I received this email about the Aztalan State Park today.  I hope you can put this event on your schedule – and I hope you will find a donation in your wallet for the building of a visitors’ center.  I am matching donations to the building project from a trust my father left.  He was very big on history, art history and archeology, so it was a natural fit.  I will be matching any donation you give…be sure to talk that up!

This picture is from the top of the most important mound at the site, looking north toward the other outer corner of the area delimited by the stockade (you should be able to see the poles at both ends as well as the corresponding mound at the other corner.  The rectangular settlement was parallel to and on the river bank. At the back of the picture on the left side, you can see the upward slope of the land:  Here there were about 7 mounds lined up in a row.  They are a little obscured by the trees.  Interestingly, these mounds and several others that no longer exist were outside the stockade.  Oh, and ps:  They were not burial mounds!

This picture is from the top of the most important mound at the site, looking north toward the other outer corner of the area delimited by the stockade (you should be able to see the poles at both ends as well as the corresponding mound at the other corner. The rectangular settlement was parallel to and on the river bank. At the back of the picture on the left side, you can see the upward slope of the land: Here there were about 7 mounds lined up in a row. They are a little obscured by the trees. Interestingly, these mounds and several others that no longer exist were outside the stockade. Oh, and ps: They were not burial mounds!

From Bob Birmingham,

The site of Aztalan at Aztalan State Park was named by Nathanial Hyer in 1837  for the place Aztec people of Mexico identified as their original homeland.  Although the site was subsequently found to have nothing to do with the Aztecs, some scholars believe that the broader culture, the Mississippian, had contacts with  ancient Mexican societies before the Aztecs. In honor of the name and possible Mexican influence, the Friends of Aztalan State Park have once again invited the speculator Aztec dancers from the famous Ballet Folklorico Nacionale of Milwaukee  to perform  at Aztalan State Park on Saturday August 17 at 1:00 PM. The event itself is free but donations for a  planned new visitor’s center at the park will be gladly accepted. A Wisconsin State Park vehicle sticker will  be needed but can be purchased at the park. For more information, contact Friends of Aztalan executive director, Bob Birmingham at  608-516-3421 or birmi@sbcglobal.net . Aztalan State Park is located near the on  County Highway Q near the intersection with Highway B, 1 mile east of  Lake Mills.
Other posts about my Aztalan State Park visits (with more pictures): July 2012 and August 2012
Also see:  Aztalan State Park

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